Most important question: How do you pronounce "router"?

[Thread from Newsgroup "comp.dcom.lans.ethernet"]

Best answer        Very best answer

Stefan Zingg Craig Wiesner Nick Roux Nigel Arnot Wolfgang Rupprecht Marina Smith Graham Minchin Stefan Zingg Szarka Aaron J. Dinkin H. Peter Anvin Roger Gammans Alistair Riddell Mark Lloyd User Larry Stefani Jim Garnett Craig Wiesner Peter Williams Rich Seifert Rich Seifert Rich Seifert Jeffrey S. Curtis Eric Adamson Pam Tom Christiansen Alan Pollock Marina Smith Peter Hullah Tom Christiansen Rich Seifert Jason V. Robertson Larry Phillips Peter Hullah Jerry Margeson Jon Rouse Markus Laker Jon Rouse Tom Christiansen Tom Christiansen Rich Mavrogeanes Bert Markus Laker Jon Rouse Chris Mann Markus Laker Mark Lloyd Ben Ostrowsky Rich Seifert

From Stefan Zingg <stefan@stefan.imp.com.BOUNCE.COM>
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet
Subject: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: Tue, 08 Jul 1997 21:45:48 +0200

Sorry for this dumb question, but:

I'm living in a German speaking country, and so I'm not sure how to
correctly pronounce "router". I've heard both versions: like "route" or
like "rout". Which one is common in US or UK? (Logically I tend to
"route", but I'm the minority.)

Thanks,
Stefan
-- 
          *  If you answer with email, please make sure   *
          *  to remove the .BOUNCE.COM from the address!  *



From Craig Wiesner <craig@wkmn.com>
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: Tue, 08 Jul 1997 17:18:20 -0700

Stefan Zingg wrote:
> 
> Sorry for this dumb question, but:
> 
> I'm living in a German speaking country, and so I'm not sure how to
> correctly pronounce "router". I've heard both versions: like "route" or
> like "rout". Which one is common in US or UK? (Logically I tend to
> "route", but I'm the minority.)
> &#
> Thanks,
> Stefan
> --
>           *  If you answer with email, please make sure   *
>           *  to remove the .BOUNCE.COM from the address!  *

Stefan,

When in America, speaking with an American accent, you say
"Raow-ter" Sounds like the word "OUT"

When in Europe, or when speaking with any accent other than
American, you say "Roooo-ter"  

In America, we have a 24-hour plumber company called
Roto-Rooter (they unclog your toilet 24 hours a day)
so I think we are loathe to call one of our $100,000
products a "rooter."

Hope that helps!

Craig Wiesner  (pronounced Weeeeesner)
WKMN Training - InternetWorking Education Specialists

From Roux_NickRemove@Lilly.Com (Nick Roux)
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: Wed, 09 Jul 1997 11:30:34 GMT

The US tends to "rout" packets, while the rest of the civilised world
prefer to "route" our packets.

Nick

On Tue, 08 Jul 1997 21:45:48 +0200, Stefan Zingg
<stefan@stefan.imp.com.BOUNCE.COM> wrote:

>Sorry for this dumb question, but:
>
>I'm living in a German speaking country, and so I'm not sure how to
>correctly pronounce "router". I've heard both versions: like "route" or
>like "rout". Which one is common in US or UK? (Logically I tend to
>"route", but I'm the minority.)
>
>Thanks,
>Stefan
>-- 
>          *  If you answer with email, please make sure   *
>          *  to remove the .BOUNCE.COM from the address!  *

From NRA@maxwell.ph.kcl.ac.uk (Nigel Arnot)
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: 9 Jul 1997 13:45:52 GMT

In article <33C298EC.4DEA@stefan.imp.com.BOUNCE.COM>, Stefan Zingg <stefan@stefan.imp.com.BOUNCE.COM> says:
>
>Sorry for this dumb question, but:
>
>I'm living in a German speaking country, and so I'm not sure how to
>correctly pronounce "router". I've heard both versions: like "route" or
>like "rout". Which one is common in US or UK? (Logically I tend to
>"route", but I'm the minority.)

In the UK the latter pronunciation designates a power tool for cutting
slots, etc, in wood. I've never heard a datacomms box pronounced
any way other than to rhyme with "route".

The general rule is that one can form a noun from a verb by sticking
-er on the end. An xxx-er is something that xxx-es. xxx is normally
pronounced the same in both cases, which fits with the above.

Is US English ungrammatical, or is "route" pronounced like "rout" in
some parts of the USA? Of course, when you get to a firewall whether
it routs or routes your packets depends on the local management :-)

From Wolfgang Rupprecht <wolfgang@dailyplanet.wsrcc.com>
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: 09 Jul 1997 07:13:07 -0700


NRA@maxwell.ph.kcl.ac.uk (Nigel Arnot) writes:
> Is US English ungrammatical, or is "route" pronounced like "rout" in
> some parts of the USA? Of course, when you get to a firewall whether
> it routs or routes your packets depends on the local management :-)

"router" is pronounced exactly like its spelled r-out-er.  (As in get
those packets "out" 'er here.)

Its only in Europe that I've heard it pronounced r-oot-er.

Whenever folks say "rooter", I picture a garden implement for working
on the subteranian part of a tree.

-wolfgang
-- 
Wolfgang Rupprecht    <wolfgang@wsrcc.com>         http://www.wsrcc.com/

From Marina Smith
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: Wed, 09 Jul 1997 18:08:24 GMT

As others have said, in the USA it's rout as in out, in the UK it's
root as in toot. Beware, however, in Australia you MUST use the
American pronounciation - root is a rude word!

Marina

Stefan Zingg <stefan@stefan.imp.com.BOUNCE.COM> wrote:

>Sorry for this dumb question, but:
>
>I'm living in a German speaking country, and so I'm not sure how to
>correctly pronounce "router". I've heard both versions: like "route" or
>like "rout". Which one is common in US or UK? (Logically I tend to
>"route", but I'm the minority.)
>
>Thanks,
>Stefan
>-- 
>          *  If you answer with email, please make sure   *
>          *  to remove the .BOUNCE.COM from the address!  *

-- 
Marina Smith - Reading U.K, to mail me remove XX from address

From Graham Minchin <gtminch@tartarus.uwa.edu.au>
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: 10 Jul 1997 14:40:57 GMT

Marina Smith wrote:
: As others have said, in the USA it's rout as in out, in the UK it's
: root as in toot. Beware, however, in Australia you MUST use the
: American pronounciation - root is a rude word!

Well I'm in Australia and I use the British pronunciation.  However, I
have a christian friend who uses the American one, simply because (as you
say) 'root' is a naughty word! :)

Graham

From Stefan Zingg <stefan@stefan.imp.com.BOUNCE.COM>
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: Fri, 11 Jul 1997 12:11:23 +0200

Thank you everybody who answered. I didn't imagine that this dumb
question would lead to such an entertaining thread. Maybe I can
contribute something myself: Looking into the O.E.D. I've found a
possible explanation of the American pronounciation.

The O.E.D states:

"route: A way, road, or course; a certain direction taken in travelling
from one place to another" ... etc.

and then:

... "beginning of the 18th; from that time down to c 1800 the usual
spelling was rout. The pronunciation ((like "out")), which appears in
early 19th cent. rimes, is still retained in military use, and by many
speakers in the U.S. and Canada."

Stefan
-- 
          *  If you answer with email, please make sure   *
          *  to remove the .BOUNCE.COM from the address!  *

From szarka@brazerko.com (Szarka)
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,alt.usage.english
Subject: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: Thu, 10 Jul 97 20:09:12 -0500

 st> From: Stefan Zingg <stefan@stefan.imp.com.BOUNCE.COM>
 st> I'm living in a German speaking country, and so I'm not sure how to
 st> correctly pronounce "router". I've heard both versions: like "route"
 st> or like "rout". Which one is common in US or UK? (Logically I tend to
 st> "route", but I'm the minority.)

The problem, of course, is that "route" is pronounced both ways, usually
depending on context.  (At least here in the States.)  "Route 66" (a
famous U.S. highway) is pronounced with the same vowel sound as "root"
or the French "roux"--not unlike the German vowel =F6 (o with umlaut).
However, a "postal route" or "newspaper route" is pronounced like "rout"
(i.e., the same vowel sound as in "round").  It is this latter
pronunciation that is used when speaking about "routing" packets using a
"router".  (At least here in the States.)

A friend and I faced this problem a few months back when having a
conversation with a Dutch friend; at first we could figure out what this
"rooter" he was talking about must be!  :)

Incidently, a now archaic meaning of "route" that actually fits the
situation quite well is that of marching orders given to a military
unit.  If you like to think of TCP/IP packets as little soldiers under
your command...  ;)  That would also be pronounced with the "rout" or
"round" vowel sound.


... Well... Spam, eggs, sausage, and Spam.  That's not got much Spam.


-- 

.---------------------------------------------------------------------.
| Brazerko Communications --- +1 860 892 INET --- szarka@brazerko.com |
| A2 B4 B9 2C 6A 6F BE C8 -- Robert Szarka -- A4 0A 00 C9 8A 13 FF 76 |
| http://www.downcity.com/szarka/ ----- 1:320/42 ----- N1XUH ----- O- |
`---------------------------------------------------------------------'

From adinkin@commschool.org (Aaron J. Dinkin)
Date: Fri, 11 Jul 1997 21:58:44 -0500
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,alt.usage.english

In article <wgcid$1$g320$h42$i0$j06c2cb69@brazerko.com>,
szarka@brazerko.com (Szarka) wrote:

>The problem, of course, is that "route" is pronounced both ways, usually
>depending on context.  (At least here in the States.)  "Route 66" (a
>famous U.S. highway) is pronounced with the same vowel sound as "root"
>or the French "roux"--not unlike the German vowel  (o with umlaut).

Even less unlike, I should think, the German vowel u.

>However, a "postal route" or "newspaper route" is pronounced like "rout"
>(i.e., the same vowel sound as in "round"). 

Er, no it's not. In my peculiar (American) idiolect, "route" is always
homophonous with "root".

-Aaron J. Dinkin
Dr. Whom

From hpa@transmeta.com (H. Peter Anvin)
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: 13 Jul 1997 09:19:50 GMT

Followup to:  <5q04mg$18k$2@willow.cc.kcl.ac.uk>
By author:    NRA@maxwell.ph.kcl.ac.uk (Nigel Arnot)
In newsgroup: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet
> 
> Is US English ungrammatical, or is "route" pronounced like "rout" in
> some parts of the USA? Of course, when you get to a firewall whether
> it routs or routes your packets depends on the local management :-)
>

When I lived in Chicago, "route" as in "Illinois Route 59" (a highway)
was *always* pronounced identially to the word "rout", so my answer
would be "yes"...

	-hpa
-- 
    PGP: 2047/2A960705 BA 03 D3 2C 14 A8 A8 BD  1E DF FE 69 EE 35 BD 74
    See http://www.zytor.com/~hpa/ for web page and full PGP public key
Always looking for a few good BOsFH.  **  Linux - the OS of global cooperation
        I am Baha'i -- ask me about it or see http://www.bahai.org/

From Roger Gammans <rgammans@compsurg.demon.co.uk>
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,alt.usage.english
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 1997 18:15:48 +0100

In article <adinkin-ya023180001107972158450001@news.usa1.com>, "Aaron J.
Dinkin" <adinkin@commschool.org> writes
>In article <wgcid$1$g320$h42$i0$j06c2cb69@brazerko.com>,
>szarka@brazerko.com (Szarka) wrote:
>>However, a "postal route" or "newspaper route" is pronounced like "rout"
>>(i.e., the same vowel sound as in "round"). 
>
>Er, no it's not. In my peculiar (American) idiolect, "route" is always
>homophonous with "root".

In England I would expect to hear "Root - er" for the n/w product you
are describing and "Rout - er" to describe a handheld (normally
electricly powered) woodworking tool consisting of a rotating side
cutter - used to cut cut indentations into the work piece to a specific
depth.
Two very different products. IMVHO.

-- 
***************************************************************************
*  Roger G. Gammans                                  -  The        er     *
*  Engineer & Director of The Computer Surgery       -          ut        *
*  e-mail: rgammans@compsurg.demon.co.uk             -       mp           *
*  Snail mail:20 Trenches Rd, Crowbro. Sx, TN6 1ES   -    Co     Surgery  *
***************************************************************************

From Alistair Riddell <alistair@watsons.edin.sch.uk>
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: Mon, 14 Jul 1997 18:39:16 +0000

Here in Scotland, we pronounce it roo-ter. I believe most 'Merkins are
inclined to say row-ter.

But then, they say prawcessor instead of processor and sometimes even
dawg instead of dog.

p.s. no offence intended.

--
Alistair Riddell - BOFH
IT Support Department, George Watson's College, Edinburgh
Tel: +44 131 447 7931 Ext 176       Fax: +44 131 452 8594

From mlloyd@baynetworks.takethisout.com (Mark Lloyd)
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 1997 02:56:58 GMT

You might want to travel up to Canada on whatever ROUTE (root) you
need to take to get here and check out the COLOUR of the leaves in
Autumn. I'm  not sure how many METRES it is from where you live but
finding the computer CENTRE is not a problem. It's there you will find
all our routers (rooters).

By the way those  leaves can be placed in a vase (vawse) for a nice
effect. 

On Fri, 11 Jul 1997 12:11:23 +0200, Stefan Zingg
<stefan@stefan.imp.com.BOUNCE.COM> wrote:

>Thank you everybody who answered. I didn't imagine that this dumb
>question would lead to such an entertaining thread. Maybe I can
>contribute something myself: Looking into the O.E.D. I've found a
>possible explanation of the American pronounciation.
>
>The O.E.D states:
>
>"route: A way, road, or course; a certain direction taken in travelling
>from one place to another" ... etc.
>
>and then:
>
>... "beginning of the 18th; from that time down to c 1800 the usual
>spelling was rout. The pronunciation ((like "out")), which appears in
>early 19th cent. rimes, is still retained in military use, and by many
>speakers in the U.S. and Canada."
>
>Stefan
>-- 
>          *  If you answer with email, please make sure   *
>          *  to remove the .BOUNCE.COM from the address!  *

Mark Lloyd
Professional Services
Bay Networks Canada

From User & <syed@hzl.saijid.org>
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 1997 05:57:18 GMT

Alistair Riddell <alistair@watsons.edin.sch.uk> writes:

> Here in Scotland, we pronounce it roo-ter. I believe most 'Merkins are
> inclined to say row-ter.
> 
> But then, they say prawcessor instead of processor and sometimes even
> dawg instead of dog.
> 
> p.s. no offence intended.

No offense taken.

> 
> --
> Alistair Riddell - BOFH
> IT Support Department, George Watson's College, Edinburgh
> Tel: +44 131 447 7931 Ext 176       Fax: +44 131 452 8594

From Larry Stefani <stefani@lkg.dec.com>
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 1997 09:01:10 -0500

Mark Lloyd wrote:
> 
> You might want to travel up to Canada on whatever ROUTE (root) you
> need to take to get here and check out the COLOUR of the leaves in
> Autumn. I'm  not sure how many METRES it is from where you live but
> finding the computer CENTRE is not a problem. It's there you will find
> all our routers (rooters).

While I'm not convinced that most American's would accept flipping the
letters "E" and "R" in words like THEATER, CENTER, METER, etc, it's not
unthinkable to believe that U.S.-based networking professionals could
start to pronounce router as "rooter".

For the uninformed, I can see how the current American pronounciation
(rhymes with "out") can cause confusion between a type of networking
equipment and a tool used in a wood shop.  Regards.
+----------------------------------------------------------------------+
| Larry Stefani                          stefani@lkg.dec.com           |
| Networks Engineering                   Digital Equipment Corporation |
| WWW: http://www.networks.digital.com/                                |
| FTP: ftp://ftp.digital.com/pub/DEC/adapters/			       |
|                     Comments are mine, of course...                  |
+----------------------------------------------------------------------+

From Jim Garnett <kborges@palmnet.net>
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: Thu, 10 Jul 1997 16:58:48 -0400

Wolfgang Rupprecht wrote:

> NRA@maxwell.ph.kcl.ac.uk (Nigel Arnot) writes:
> > Is US English ungrammatical, 

Yes, very!

> > or is "route" pronounced like "rout" in
> > some parts of the USA? 

Seriously, yes.  Route can be pronounced 'rout' or 'root' depending on
where you're from.  I say rout, but I've lived all over, so I don't know
if I'm right or wrong.


-- 
   --My grandmother's brain was dead, but her heart was still beating.
     It was the first time we ever had a democrat in the family
   --If you haven't taken the World's Smallest Political Quiz, visit the
   web page http://www.self-gov.org/quiz.html

From Craig Wiesner <craig@wkmn.com>
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 1997 15:45:45 -0700

To All,

This has been such a fun thread, I'm glad the original poster
asked the question. When I teach classes abroad, or I know that
I have non-U.S. students in my class, I generally pronounce
it "Rooter" since that is what I most often hear non-Americans
say. Since we are on a pronunciation kick anyway, I was wondering
how do you pronounce ISAKMP/Oakley? Is it "Isakemp / Oakley" or
"I S A K M P / Oakley?" or "ISA K M P / Oakley"? And who's Oakley
anyway and does he know Diffie and Helman?

Craig


Larry Stefani wrote:
> 
> Mark Lloyd wrote:
> >
> > You might want to travel up to Canada on whatever ROUTE (root) you
> > need to take to get here and check out the COLOUR of the leaves in
> > Autumn. I'm  not sure how many METRES it is from where you live but
> > finding the computer CENTRE is not a problem. It's there you will find
> > all our routers (rooters).
> 
> While I'm not convinced that most American's would accept flipping the
> letters "E" and "R" in words like THEATER, CENTER, METER, etc, it's not
> unthinkable to believe that U.S.-based networking professionals could
> start to pronounce router as "rooter".
> 
> For the uninformed, I can see how the current American pronounciation
> (rhymes with "out") can cause confusion between a type of networking
> equipment and a tool used in a wood shop.  Regards.
> +----------------------------------------------------------------------+
> | Larry Stefani                          stefani@lkg.dec.com           |
> | Networks Engineering                   Digital Equipment Corporation |
> | WWW: http://www.networks.digital.com/                                |
> | FTP: ftp://ftp.digital.com/pub/DEC/adapters/                         |
> |                     Comments are mine, of course...                  |
> +----------------------------------------------------------------------+

From peter.williams@hendersons.com.au (Peter Williams)
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: Tue, 15 Jul 1997 19:43:30 GMT

Mark,
For the most part I'm with you. Aussies do it the same way as Canadians,
althought the accent is different. But we say router (rowter) because
rooter means one who roots. Rooting is having sex in Australia, so it
all starts to sound a bit rude if you are discussing routers and routing.
We do however take the most direct route (root) when we are in a
hurry to get somewhere.

Peter.


In article <33cae5a8.5708743@news>, mlloyd@baynetworks.takethisout.com (Mark 
Lloyd) wrote:
>You might want to travel up to Canada on whatever ROUTE (root) you
>need to take to get here and check out the COLOUR of the leaves in
>Autumn. I'm  not sure how many METRES it is from where you live but
>finding the computer CENTRE is not a problem. It's there you will find
>all our routers (rooters).
>
>By the way those  leaves can be placed in a vase (vawse) for a nice
>effect. 
>
>On Fri, 11 Jul 1997 12:11:23 +0200, Stefan Zingg
><stefan@stefan.imp.com.BOUNCE.COM> wrote:
>
>>Thank you everybody who answered. I didn't imagine that this dumb
>>question would lead to such an entertaining thread. Maybe I can
>>contribute something myself: Looking into the O.E.D. I've found a
>>possible explanation of the American pronounciation.
>>
>>The O.E.D states:
>>
>>"route: A way, road, or course; a certain direction taken in travelling
>>from one place to another" ... etc.
>>
>>and then:
>>
>>... "beginning of the 18th; from that time down to c 1800 the usual
>>spelling was rout. The pronunciation ((like "out")), which appears in
>>early 19th cent. rimes, is still retained in military use, and by many
>>speakers in the U.S. and Canada."
>>
>>Stefan
>>-- 
>>          *  If you answer with email, please make sure   *
>>          *  to remove the .BOUNCE.COM from the address!  *
>
>Mark Lloyd
>Professional Services
>Bay Networks Canada

From seifert@netcom.com (Rich Seifert)
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,alt.usage.english
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 1997 21:56:34 GMT

In article <iPvcwAAE7lyzEwR1@compsurg.demon.co.uk>, Roger Gammans
<rgammans@compsurg.demon.co.uk> wrote:

> 
> In England I would expect to hear "Root - er" for the n/w product you
> are describing and "Rout - er" to describe a handheld (normally
> electricly powered) woodworking tool consisting of a rotating side
> cutter - used to cut cut indentations into the work piece to a specific
> depth.
> Two very different products. IMVHO.

In my home/office, I have both a ROOTER (with appropriate rooting tables),
and a ROUT-ER (mounted in a routing table). They are most definitely not
the same product. One creates a huge mess every time I use it, and the
other carves wood.

-- 
Rich Seifert                    Networks and Communications Consulting
seifert@netcom.com              21885 Bear Creek Way
(408) 395-5700                  Los Gatos, CA 95030
(408) 395-1966 FAX
"... specialists in Local Area Networks and Data Communications systems"

Look for my upcoming book on Gigabit Ethernet and Advanced Ethernet technology,
from Addison-Wesley! (Available Spring 1998)

From seifert@netcom.com (Rich Seifert)
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,alt.usage.english
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 1997 21:50:32 GMT

In article <wgcid$1$g320$h42$i0$j06c2cb69@brazerko.com>,
szarka@brazerko.com (Szarka) wrote:

>  st> From: Stefan Zingg <stefan@stefan.imp.com.BOUNCE.COM>
>  st> I'm living in a German speaking country, and so I'm not sure how to
>  st> correctly pronounce "router". I've heard both versions: like "route"
>  st> or like "rout". Which one is common in US or UK? (Logically I tend to
>  st> "route", but I'm the minority.)
> 
> The problem, of course, is that "route" is pronounced both ways, usually
> depending on context.  (At least here in the States.)  "Route 66" (a
> famous U.S. highway) is pronounced with the same vowel sound as "root"
> or the French "roux"--not unlike the German vowel  (o with umlaut).
> However, a "postal route" or "newspaper route" is pronounced like "rout"
> (i.e., the same vowel sound as in "round").  It is this latter
> pronunciation that is used when speaking about "routing" packets using a
> "router".  (At least here in the States.)
> 

Well, *I* am here in the states, and have ALWAYS pronounced it "ROOT-er".
It started out as a sort of East Coast-West Coast thing. (You can always
tell if someone is a student of mine on the West Coast; they pronounce
"router" *correctly* (i.e., ROOT-er)!

-- 
Rich Seifert                    Networks and Communications Consulting
seifert@netcom.com              21885 Bear Creek Way
(408) 395-5700                  Los Gatos, CA 95030
(408) 395-1966 FAX
"... specialists in Local Area Networks and Data Communications systems"

Look for my upcoming book on Gigabit Ethernet and Advanced Ethernet technology,
from Addison-Wesley! (Available Spring 1998)

From seifert@netcom.com (Rich Seifert)
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: Wed, 16 Jul 1997 21:54:20 GMT

In article <5qa6jm$3pg$1@palladium.transmeta.com>, hpa@transmeta.com (H.
Peter Anvin) wrote:
> 
> When I lived in Chicago, "route" as in "Illinois Route 59" (a highway)
> was *always* pronounced identially to the word "rout", so my answer
> would be "yes"...
> 

And of course, we should not forget those great song lyrics:

  "Get your kicks, on ROOT Sixty-Six"

and the Beach Boys,

  "We'll all be plannin' out a ROOT,
   We're gonna take real soon.
   We're waxin' down our surfboards,
   We can't wait for June.

   We'll all be gone for the summer,
   We're on surfari to stay.
   Tell the teacher we're surfin',
   Surfin' USA"

-- 
Rich Seifert                    Networks and Communications Consulting
seifert@netcom.com              21885 Bear Creek Way
(408) 395-5700                  Los Gatos, CA 95030
(408) 395-1966 FAX
"... specialists in Local Area Networks and Data Communications systems"

Look for my upcoming book on Gigabit Ethernet and Advanced Ethernet technology,
from Addison-Wesley! (Available Spring 1998)

From curtis@anl.gov (Jeffrey S. Curtis)
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: 16 Jul 1997 23:15:10 GMT

seifert@netcom.com (Rich Seifert) writes:
}hpa@transmeta.com (H. Peter Anvin) wrote:
}> 
}> When I lived in Chicago, "route" as in "Illinois Route 59" (a highway)
}> was *always* pronounced identially to the word "rout", so my answer
}> would be "yes"...
}> 
}
}And of course, we should not forget those great song lyrics:
}
}  "Get your kicks, on ROOT Sixty-Six"  [...]

For what it's worth, I can spit out my apartment window and hit Illinois
Route 59, and it's rare to hear anyone pronounce it "root".  Anyone who
calls a router a "rooter" around here gets very funny looks from the
people he's talking to.

Jeff (expectorator extraordinaire)
-- 
Jeffrey S. Curtis                      | Internetwork Manager
Argonne National Laboratory            | Email: curtis@anl.gov
9700 South Cass Avenue, ECT-221        | Voice: 630/252-1789
Argonne, IL 60439                      | Fax:   630/252-9689

From adamsone@egr.msu.edu (Eric Adamson)
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 1997 03:56:54 GMT

In article <seifert-ya023060041607971454200001@192.0.2.3>, seifert@netcom.com (Rich Seifert) wrote:
>In article <5qa6jm$3pg$1@palladium.transmeta.com>, hpa@transmeta.com (H.
>Peter Anvin) wrote:
>> 
>> When I lived in Chicago, "route" as in "Illinois Route 59" (a highway)
>> was *always* pronounced identially to the word "rout", so my answer
>> would be "yes"...
>> 
>
>And of course, we should not forget those great song lyrics:
>
>  "Get your kicks, on ROOT Sixty-Six"
>
>and the Beach Boys,
>
>  "We'll all be plannin' out a ROOT,
>   We're gonna take real soon.
>   We're waxin' down our surfboards,
>   We can't wait for June.
>
>   We'll all be gone for the summer,
>   We're on surfari to stay.
>   Tell the teacher we're surfin',
>   Surfin' USA"
>

Certainly fine songs, but they DO smack of the sixties -- I hear people 
actually wore DUNGAREES back then!

In case our European friends are left confused by my remark, "dungarees" has 
become officially archaic in US English.  My suspicion is that here in the US, 
where an "old" house is scarcely 250 years old, we simply have little sense of 
tradition, and there is no "proper" language here -- just a steadily-changing 
vernacular.

Regards,

  Eric

  --------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Eric Adamson                           
    Michigan State University             UNIX -- It's even easier WITHOUT 
    adamsone@egr.msu.edu                          the monkey glove!
    http://web.egr.msu.edu/~adamsone
  --------------------------------------------------------------------------

From pthornwgtn@ihug.co.nz (Pam)
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,alt.usage.english
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: Thu, 17 Jul 1997 08:03:22 GMT

On Wed, 16 Jul 1997 21:50:32 GMT, seifert@netcom.com (Rich Seifert)
wrote:

>In article <wgcid$1$g320$h42$i0$j06c2cb69@brazerko.com>,
>szarka@brazerko.com (Szarka) wrote:
>
>>  st> From: Stefan Zingg <stefan@stefan.imp.com.BOUNCE.COM>
>>  st> I'm living in a German speaking country, and so I'm not sure how to
>>  st> correctly pronounce "router". I've heard both versions: like "route"
>>  st> or like "rout". Which one is common in US or UK? (Logically I tend to
>>  st> "route", but I'm the minority.)
>> 
<snip>

In UK and here in New Zealand I have only ever heard it pronounced
router (ou as in how).

~~~ Pam ~~~
----------------------------------------------------------------
"Negative Capability, that is, when a man is capable of being in
uncertainties, mysteries, doubts, without any irritable reaching after
fact and reason."     John Keats
----------------------------------------------------------------------

{Remove wgtn in sig to reply}

From Tom Christiansen <tchrist@mox.perl.com>
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,alt.usage.english
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: 17 Jul 1997 20:09:45 GMT

 [courtesy cc of this posting sent to cited author via email]

In article <wgcid$1$g320$h42$i0$j06c2cb69@brazerko.com>,
    szarka@brazerko.com (Szarka) wrote:

>I'm living in a German speaking country, and so I'm not sure how to
>pronounce "router". I've heard both versions: like "route"
>or like "rout". Which one is common in US or UK? (Logically I tend to
>"route", but I'm the minority.)

I've afraid that doesn't say anything.  In the dialect native to the
upper midwest, "route" and "rout" are both pronounced the same way,
rhyming with "shout" and "tout".  This is the same place where "root"
(in the ground) rhymes with "foot" and "soot".

--tom
-- 
	Tom Christiansen	tchrist@jhereg.perl.com


I'm not writing any more tapes, ever.  --Andrew Hume

From nexus@king.cts.com (Alan Pollock)
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,alt.usage.english
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: 18 Jul 1997 05:07:33 GMT

Tom Christiansen (tchrist@mox.perl.com) wrote:
:  [courtesy cc of this posting sent to cited author via email]
: 
: In article <wgcid$1$g320$h42$i0$j06c2cb69@brazerko.com>,
:     szarka@brazerko.com (Szarka) wrote:
: 
: >I'm living in a German speaking country, and so I'm not sure how to
: >pronounce "router". I've heard both versions: like "route"
: >or like "rout". Which one is common in US or UK? (Logically I tend to
: >"route", but I'm the minority.)
: 
: I've afraid that doesn't say anything.  In the dialect native to the
: upper midwest, "route" and "rout" are both pronounced the same way,
: rhyming with "shout" and "tout".  This is the same place where "root"
: (in the ground) rhymes with "foot" and "soot".
: 
: --tom
: -- 
: 	Tom Christiansen	tchrist@jhereg.perl.com
: 
: 
: I'm not writing any more tapes, ever.  --Andrew Hume

-- 

Both are correct. Nex

__________________________________________________________________________

"Ah, if in this world there were no such thing as cherry blossoms, perhaps
then in springtime our hearts would be at peace." Ariwara no Narihira
__________________________________________________________________________

From Marina Smith
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 1997 15:38:17 GMT

adamsone@egr.msu.edu (Eric Adamson) wrote:

>In case our European friends are left confused by my remark, "dungarees" has 
>become officially archaic in US English.  My suspicion is that here in the US, 
>where an "old" house is scarcely 250 years old, we simply have little sense of 
>tradition, and there is no "proper" language here -- just a steadily-changing 
>vernacular.

250! when I visited the U.S. in the '70s, a friend told me he lived in
a "real old" house - it turned out be 1930s-built. He asked how old
our house was and when I said 100 years, he assumed it was some kind
of a palace. Anyone who has visited London knows it is mostly built of
terraced Victorian two-up two-downs (US-speak: small 19th century row
houses).

Marina
-- 
Marina Smith - Reading U.K, to mail me remove XX from address

From Peter Hullah <Peter.Hullah@eurocontrol.fr>
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,alt.usage.english
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 1997 17:51:56 +0200

Pam wrote:
> 
> In UK and here in New Zealand I have only ever heard it pronounced
> router (ou as in how).
> 

I don't know where you've been in the UK but I have NEVER heard
a Brit pronounce it 'raouter' - it's ALWAYS 'rooter'.

You must have been talking to some Yanks while you were there!

-- 

Peter H.C. Hullah                    Technical Services
mailto:Peter.Hullah@eurocontrol.fr   EUROCONTROL Experimental Centre
Phone: +33 1 69 88 75 49             BP 15, Rue des Bordes,
Fax:   +33 1 60 85 15 04             91222 BRETIGNY SUR ORGE CEDEX
                                     France

From Tom Christiansen <tchrist@mox.perl.com>
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,alt.usage.english
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: 19 Jul 1997 16:01:45 GMT

 [courtesy cc of this posting sent to cited author via email]

In alt.usage.english, 
    Peter Hullah <Peter.Hullah@eurocontrol.fr> writes:
:I don't know where you've been in the UK but I have NEVER heard
:a Brit pronounce it 'raouter' - it's ALWAYS 'rooter'.

You assume that "rooter" meets something soundwise.  Remember
that many non-city-slicker midwesterners pronounce "root" to 
rhyme with "foot".  There's a reason ASCII IPA exists, you know.

    "route"	/rAUt/ 	    /rut/
    "router"	/rAUtR/     /rutR/
    "roter"	/roUtR/
    "root"	/rUt/	    /rut/  	    
    "foot"	/fUt/
    "room"	/rum/
    "rut"	/r@t/
    "some"	/s@m/
    "rout"	/rAUt/
    "wrote"	/roUt/
    "wrought"	/rOt/	    /rAt/
    "taught"	/tOt/	    /tAt/
    "rat"	/r&t/

--tom
-- 
	Tom Christiansen	tchrist@jhereg.perl.com


It's all magic.  :-)    --Larry Wall in <7282@jpl-devvax.JPL.NASA.GOV>

From seifert@netcom.com (Rich Seifert)
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: Sun, 20 Jul 1997 18:57:58 GMT

In article <5qk52g$nb0$2@msunews.cl.msu.edu>, adamsone@egr.msu.edu (Eric
Adamson) wrote:

> 
> Certainly fine songs, but they DO smack of the sixties -- I hear people 
> actually wore DUNGAREES back then!
> 

As we say in Berkeley, "If you remember the 60's, you weren't there!"

-- 
Rich Seifert                    Networks and Communications Consulting
seifert@netcom.com              21885 Bear Creek Way
(408) 395-5700                  Los Gatos, CA 95030
(408) 395-1966 FAX
"... specialists in Local Area Networks and Data Communications systems"

Look for my upcoming book on Gigabit Ethernet and Advanced Ethernet technology,
from Addison-Wesley! (Available Spring 1998)

From jvrobert@sedona.intel.com (Jason V. Robertson~)
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,alt.usage.english
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: 19 Jul 1997 06:46:54 GMT

In article <33CF911C.24F6@eurocontrol.fr>,
Peter Hullah  <Peter.Hullah@eurocontrol.fr> wrote:
>Pam wrote:
>> 
>> In UK and here in New Zealand I have only ever heard it pronounced
>> router (ou as in how).
>> 
>
>I don't know where you've been in the UK but I have NEVER heard
>a Brit pronounce it 'raouter' - it's ALWAYS 'rooter'.
>
>You must have been talking to some Yanks while you were there!
>

'rooter' huh?  Funny - it's not spelled that way :)
-- 
|Jason V. Robertson <jvrobert@sedona.intel.com> |
|Not speaking for Intel.                        |

From Larry Phillips <larryp@SPAMBEGONE.rogers.wave.ca>
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,alt.usage.english
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 1997 23:57:27 -0700

In article <wgcid$1$g320$h42$i0$j06c2cb69@brazerko.com>,
     szarka@brazerko.com (Szarka) wrote:
 
>I'm living in a German speaking country, and so I'm not sure how to
>pronounce "router". I've heard both versions: like "route"
>or like "rout". Which one is common in US or UK? (Logically I tend to
>"route", but I'm the minority.)

Around here, I hear both, excepot for a particular kind of router,
whjich is a power tool with a spinning shaft holding a cutting tool,
used to 'rout' (as in dig out) a slot or fancy edge in wood. In this
case, it is always rhymed with 'outer'.

From Peter Hullah <Peter.Hullah@eurocontrol.fr>
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,alt.usage.english
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: Mon, 21 Jul 1997 18:33:41 +0200

Tom Christiansen wrote:
> 
>  [courtesy cc of this posting sent to cited author via email]
> 
> In alt.usage.english,
>     Peter Hullah <Peter.Hullah@eurocontrol.fr> writes:
> :I don't know where you've been in the UK but I have NEVER heard
> :a Brit pronounce it 'raouter' - it's ALWAYS 'rooter'.
> 
> You assume that "rooter" meets something soundwise.  Remember
> that many non-city-slicker midwesterners pronounce "root" to
> rhyme with "foot".  There's a reason ASCII IPA exists, you know.

Yeah - sorry. I normally use it but was too lazy to look it
up on this occasion, and of course ...

From Jerry Margeson <jerrym@uvonics.com>
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 1997 14:54:08 -0400

> In article <wgcid$1$g320$h42$i0$j06c2cb69@brazerko.com>,
>     szarka@brazerko.com (Szarka) wrote:
> 
> >I'm living in a German speaking country, and so I'm not sure how to
> >pronounce "router". I've heard both versions: like "route"
> >or like "rout". Which one is common in US or UK? (Logically I tend to
> >"route", but I'm the minority.)

Strange.  Here in Midwest America, I have heard both pronunciations
of the word "route", and never-ending arguments over which one is
correct.  This has followed me around all my life.

However, I have never heard a moments hesitation over the pronunciation
of "router" from anyone I have talked to (in this country).
"Route", as in "stout".
--------------------------------------------------------------------
For 93 million miles, there is nothing between the sun and my shadow
except me.  I'm always getting in the way of something...

Jerry J. Margeson    jerrym@uvonics.com     http://www.coil.com/~jjm

From Jon Rouse <rousej@postoffice.co.ukx>
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,alt.usage.english
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 1997 13:43:36 +0100

Tom Christiansen wrote:
> 
> You assume that "rooter" meets something soundwise.  Remember
> that many non-city-slicker midwesterners pronounce "root" to
> rhyme with "foot".

Ah, but is that 'foot' (to rhyme with 'boot') or 'fut'?

-- 
The views expressed are my own and may not represent those of my employer.
Please remove any obvious anti-spam measures from the return mail address.

From laker@tcp.co.uk (Markus Laker)
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,alt.usage.english
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 1997 21:01:08 GMT

Tom Christiansen <tchrist@mox.perl.com>:

[courtesy cc of this posting sent to cited author via email]

Let me gratuitously muddy the waters by adding an extra column
containing the standard British pronunciations of these words, which are
different in almost every case:

>     "route"	/rAUt/ 	    /rut/	/ru:t/
>     "router"	/rAUtR/     /rutR/	/'ru:t@/ (E'net), /raUt@/ (woodwork)
>     "roter"	/roUtR/		/r@Ut@/	(should be 'rotor'?)
>     "root"	/rUt/	    /rut/	/ru:t/
>     "foot"	/fUt/		/fUt/
>     "room"	/rum/		/ru:m/
>     "rut"	/r@t/		/rVt/
>     "some"	/s@m/		/sVm/
>     "rout"	/rAUt/		/raUt/
>     "wrote"	/roUt/		/r@Ut/
>     "wrought"	/rOt/	    /rAt/	/rO:t/
>     "taught"	/tOt/	    /tAt/	/tO:t/
>     "rat"	/r&t/		/r&t/

Markus Laker.

-- 
My newsfeed is dropping messages again.
*Please* send an emailed copy of any reply.

From Jon Rouse <rousej@postoffice.co.ukx>
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,alt.usage.english
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 1997 09:45:22 +0100

Markus Laker wrote:
> 
> Let me gratuitously muddy the waters by adding an extra column
> containing the standard British pronunciations of these words, which are
> different in almost every case:

Curiously the British pronunciation you gave tended to be northern english 
rather than received pronunciation or 'BBC' english. Perhaps you need another 
couple of columns?

-- 
The views expressed are my own and may not represent those of my employer.
Please remove any obvious anti-spam measures from the return mail address.

From Tom Christiansen <tchrist@mox.perl.com>
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,alt.usage.english
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: 23 Jul 1997 13:54:34 GMT

 [courtesy cc of this posting sent to cited author via email]

In alt.usage.english, 
    Jon Rouse <rousej@postoffice.co.uk> writes:
:> You assume that "rooter" meets something soundwise.  Remember
:> that many non-city-slicker midwesterners pronounce "root" to
:> rhyme with "foot".
:
:Ah, but is that 'foot' (to rhyme with 'boot') or 'fut'?

No, "foot" doesn't rhyme with "boot" and "suit" in the 
plain-speakin', rural, heart-land of America.  It rhymes
with "put" and "soot".   Here are some rhyming sets; 
each column has a different ending sound:

    boot   bout   but    cot   foot   fought
    hoot   gout   cut    dot   put    taught
    loot   lout   gut    got   root   sought
    moot   out    hut    hot   soot   thought
    shoot  pout   jut    jot          fraught
    toot   rout   nut    lot          bought
                  rut    not          wrought
                         pot
                         rot

--tom
-- 
	Tom Christiansen	tchrist@jhereg.perl.com

"I think contraception is disgusting --people using each other for pleasure."
    --Joseph Scheidler, Director, Pro-Life Action League

From Tom Christiansen <tchrist@mox.perl.com>
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,alt.usage.english
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: 23 Jul 1997 14:22:59 GMT

 [courtesy cc of this posting sent to cited author via email]

In alt.usage.english, 
    laker@tcp.co.uk (Markus Laker) writes:
:Let me gratuitously muddy the waters by adding an extra column
:containing the standard British pronunciations of these words, which are
:different in almost every case:

I believe that I messed up on the IPA.  See my other posting
for rhyming sets of these words.

--tom
-- 
	Tom Christiansen	tchrist@jhereg.perl.com


I'm TRYING to be a back end!  - --Andrew Hume

From Rich Mavrogeanes <rmavro@snet.net>
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: Tue, 22 Jul 1997 21:24:16 -0400

>I'm living in a German speaking country, and so I'm not sure how to
>pronounce "router". I've heard both versions: like "route"
>or like "rout". Which one is common in US or UK? (Logically I tend to
>"route", but I'm the minority.)
> 
>> Strange.  Here in Midwest America, I have heard both pronunciations
>> of the word "route", and never-ending arguments over which one is
>> correct.  This has followed me around all my life.
> 
> However, I have never heard a moments hesitation over the pronunciation
> of "router" from anyone I have talked to (in this country).
> "Route", as in "stout".

A "Rooter" forwards packets, and is produced by companies like 
Cisco, Bay, and many others.  A "Router" is made by companies 
like Black and Decker, Sears, and many others. They booth deal 
with bits.




Rich Mavro
Network Consultant
rmavro@snet.net

From manfredi@arl.bna.boeing.com
Date: Wed, 23 Jul 1997 16:13:25 -0600
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet

In article <5r52eq$98u$1@csnews.cs.colorado.edu>,
  tchrist@mox.perl.com (Tom Christiansen) wrote:

[ ... ]

> No, "foot" doesn't rhyme with "boot" and "suit" in the
> plain-speakin', rural, heart-land of America.  It rhymes
> with "put" and "soot".   Here are some rhyming sets;
> each column has a different ending sound:
>
>     boot   bout   but    cot   foot   fought
>     hoot   gout   cut    dot   put    taught
>     loot   lout   gut    got   root   sought
>     moot   out    hut    hot   soot   thought
>     shoot  pout   jut    jot          fraught
>     toot   rout   nut    lot          bought
>                   rut    not          wrought
>                          pot
>                          rot

I suppose it's always strange to see people deliberately mis-pronounce
words. I tend to assume that when it's done, it's done by mistake.

For example, in the above, all seems fine until root (say, of a tree), is
made to rhyme with soot or foot.

So, I say, no. Root rhymes with roof! Ooops, even that doesn't make it
clear, since those who say that root rhymes with soot probably also say
ruf instead of roooof.

That said, in spite of Prof Seifert's pronouncements here and in print, I
have heard router pronounced raaaoooter in the East Coast, West Coast,
and Hawaii, and virtually all the time. The rare exception has been, in
my experience, from people who were apparently using the term for the
very first time.

And no, I don't say raaaooot 66.

Bert
manfredi@arl.bna.boeing.com

-------------------==== Posted via Deja News ====-----------------------
      http://www.dejanews.com/     Search, Read, Post to Usenet

From laker@tcp.co.uk (Markus Laker)
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,alt.usage.english
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: Thu, 24 Jul 1997 17:05:20 GMT

Jon Rouse <rousej@postoffice.co.ukx>:

> Curiously the British pronunciation you gave tended to be northern english 
> rather than received pronunciation or 'BBC' english. Perhaps you need another 
> couple of columns?

Eh?  In (say) Yorkshire English, 'rut' and 'foot' would have the same
vowel, [U], but I gave them as [rVt] and [fUt].  'Room' might be [rUm],
same as 'rum', but I wrote [ru:m].  'Wrote' would be something like
[ro:t] or [roUt], but I gave a crystalline RP [r@Ut].

I did make a mistake, but it was in using /slashes/ rather than [square
brackets].  I was, of course, discussing phonetics, not phonemics (that
is, the sound made by the words, as opposed to the meaning carried by
the sounds).

Markus Laker.

-- 
My newsfeed is dropping messages again.
*Please* send an emailed copy of any reply.

From Jon Rouse <rousej@postoffice.co.ukx>
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,alt.usage.english
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 1997 11:45:14 +0100

Markus Laker wrote:
> 
> Eh?  In (say) Yorkshire English, 'rut' and 'foot' would have the same
> vowel, [U], but I gave them as [rVt] and [fUt].

How on earth do you pronounce rvt? ruhvert?

In the south they would say 'raat' rather than 'rut'.


-- 
The views expressed are my own and may not represent those of my employer.
Please remove any obvious anti-spam measures from the return mail address.

From cm@ns.uk1.vbc.net (Chris Mann)
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,alt.usage.english
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: 25 Jul 1997 11:14:40 GMT

Jason V. Robertson~ (jvrobert@sedona.intel.com) wrote:
:
: 'rooter' huh?  Funny - it's not spelled that way :)

[Dull mode on]

A networking router (as opposed to the tool you rout with) gets its
name from the word "route" which is taken from the French language
(it's the French word for "road").

I believe that Americans pronounce "route" so that it rhymes with
"out". Brits on the other hand pronounce it "root" which is the same
as the French pronunciation (making allowance for accents etc.)

[Dull mode off]

So, if you're in Germany I suggest you show a little European solidarity
and refuse to bow to American cultural imperialism!

(Insert smileys if humoristically challenged)

Chris (not s

From laker@tcp.co.uk (Markus Laker)
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet,alt.usage.english
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: Mon, 28 Jul 1997 20:21:24 GMT

Jon Rouse <rousej@postoffice.co.ukx>:

> Markus Laker wrote:
> > 
> > Eh?  In (say) Yorkshire English, 'rut' and 'foot' would have the same
> > vowel, [U], but I gave them as [rVt] and [fUt].
> 
> How on earth do you pronounce rvt? ruhvert?

I think we're talking across porpoises here.  I'm using a scheme called
ASCII IPA, which aims to express pronunciation in a dialect-independent
way and so avoid exchanges like this:

   -- It has the same vowel as 'cup'

   -- No, that's the same one as in 'foot'.  You mean the vowel in
	'loot'.

   -- No, that's the vowel in 'book'.  You mean the vowel in . . . .

Believe it or not, [V] is a vowel -- it's the one an educated Londoner
(but not necessarily an educated Yorkshireman) uses in 'cup'.  You can
find a description of ASCII IPA in our excellent FAQ, which is available
from the usual places, including <ftp://rtfm.mit.edu> and
<http://src.doc.ic.ac.uk>.  You can also get a copy by sending me a
blank email message with the words 'make money fast' in the title; my
mailer will respond automatically next time I log on.

> In the south they would say 'raat' rather than 'rut'.

I know.  I was born in Saaf Lunnen.

Markus Laker.

-- 
My newsfeed is dropping messages again.
*Please* send an emailed copy of any reply.

From mlloyd@baynetworks.takethisout.com (Mark Lloyd)
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 1997 16:43:20 GMT

Puts a whole new twist on rooting for a team you like!!!

Mark.

On Tue, 15 Jul 1997 19:43:30 GMT, peter.williams@hendersons.com.au
(Peter Williams) wrote:

>Mark,
>For the most part I'm with you. Aussies do it the same way as Canadians,
>althought the accent is different. But we say router (rowter) because
>rooter means one who roots. Rooting is having sex in Australia, so it
>all starts to sound a bit rude if you are discussing routers and routing.
>We do however take the most direct route (root) when we are in a
>hurry to get somewhere.
>
>Peter.
>
>
>In article <33cae5a8.5708743@news>, mlloyd@baynetworks.takethisout.com (Mark
>Lloyd) wrote:
>>You might want to travel up to Canada on whatever ROUTE (root) you
>>need to take to get here and check out the COLOUR of the leaves in
>>Autumn. I'm  not sure how many METRES it is from where you live but
>>finding the computer CENTRE is not a problem. It's there you will find
>>all our routers (rooters).
>>
>>By the way those  leaves can be placed in a vase (vawse) for a nice
>>effect.
>>
>>On Fri, 11 Jul 1997 12:11:23 +0200, Stefan Zingg
>><stefan@stefan.imp.com.BOUNCE.COM> wrote:
>>
>>>Thank you everybody who answered. I didn't imagine that this dumb
>>>question would lead to such an entertaining thread. Maybe I can
>>>contribute something myself: Looking into the O.E.D. I've found a
>>>possible explanation of the American pronounciation.
>>>
>>>The O.E.D states:
>>>
>>>"route: A way, road, or course; a certain direction taken in travelling
>>>from one place to another" ... etc.
>>>
>>>and then:
>>>
>>>... "beginning of the 18th; from that time down to c 1800 the usual
>>>spelling was rout. The pronunciation ((like "out")), which appears in
>>>early 19th cent. rimes, is still retained in military use, and by many
>>>speakers in the U.S. and Canada."
>>>
>>>Stefan
>>>--
>>>          *  If you answer with email, please make sure   *
>>>          *  to remove the .BOUNCE.COM from the address!  *
>>
>>Mark Lloyd
>>Professional Services
>>Bay Networks Canada

Mark Lloyd
Professional Services
Bay Networks Canada

From bostrows@luna.cas.usf.edu (Ben Ostrowsky)
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: 30 Jul 1997 20:15:28 GMT

>>For the most part I'm with you. Aussies do it the same way as Canadians,
>>althought the accent is different. But we say router (rowter) because
>>rooter means one who roots. Rooting is having sex in Australia, so it
>>all starts to sound a bit rude if you are discussing routers and routing.

Right, that settles it.  I'm saying 'rooter' from now on.

Ben

-- 
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From seifert@netcom.com (Rich Seifert)
Newsgroups: comp.dcom.lans.ethernet
Subject: Re: How do you pronounce "router"?
Date: Thu, 31 Jul 1997 00:11:02 GMT

In article <5ro7d0$kg0$1@news.usf.edu>, bostrows@luna.cas.usf.edu (Ben
Ostrowsky) wrote:

> >>For the most part I'm with you. Aussies do it the same way as Canadians,
> >>althought the accent is different. But we say router (rowter) because
> >>rooter means one who roots. Rooting is having sex in Australia, so it
> >>all starts to sound a bit rude if you are discussing routers and routing.
> 
> Right, that settles it.  I'm saying 'rooter' from now on.
> 

Indeed! The whole question of 'rooting' performance takes on a new meaning!
It may not be so bad to have a slooooow 'rooter'.

-- 
Rich Seifert                    Networks and Communications Consulting
seifert@netcom.com              21885 Bear Creek Way
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